jump to navigation

Learning 2.0 Is Like Punk Rock September 12, 2008

Posted by B.J. Schone in eLearning.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
11 comments

I had a fun discussion last night with several friends / colleagues. We were trying to hypothesize why so many (e)Learning 2.0 initiatives don’t get the traction we would expect, both at our organization and at other organizations. Several of us learning tech geeks see such great opportunities with learning 2.0, but it sometimes feels like others just don’t get it. We have fantastic tools at our disposal, like blogs, social bookmarking, wikis, RSS, etc. – and many of these tools are free. However, it feels like we’re pulling teeth when we try to make a business case to show the value and possibilities for these tools. To get around this, we’re seeing more grassroots movements take place. Instead of waiting for top-down direction, employees are installing learning 2.0 tools/technologies and experimenting with them on their own.

Peggy Gartin, a friend and colleague, came up with a great simile: Learning 2.0 is like punk rock. Punk is a music genre that defies the mainstream. It grows from people wanting to express themselves and share their work; they don’t wait for an executive at a record label to provide them with ideas. Punk embraces a DIY (do it yourself) ethic, with many bands self-producing their recordings and distributing them through informal channels (A bit of that definition was borrowed from Wikipedia.). This resonates with what I’ve seen related to learning 2.0. If you try to harness it, control it, and direct it, you’ll lose its magic. It won’t have the same effect. If you force people to use social bookmarking, they’ll ignore it. If you force them to blog, they’ll get writer’s block. On the other hand, if you provide these tools and let people run with their ideas, I believe you’ll see much better results.

Many executives are still in the early stages of hearing about learning 2.0 and they’re still trying to get their hands around it. From what I’ve seen, the key may lie in the everyday learning and technology professionals like you and me. We should continue to test-drive tools and technologies. Experiment on your own and find out what works best for you and your organization. Don’t wait for some suit in an executive office to tell you what to do. We need to be the rebellious ones. Now go forth and rock. 🙂

Advertisements

The Business Value of Web 2.0 Learning Tools August 20, 2008

Posted by B.J. Schone in eLearning.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

Jay Cross cracks me up (in a good way). When he’s not sharing gorgeous travel photos (including pictures of some of the most unique food you’ll ever see), he comes up with gems related to informal learning and educational technology. One of his latest offerings is a chart that outlines a variety of Web 2.0 tools, including a brief description of their business value. This is great! I appreciate that Jay is able to succinctly articulate their business value, especially because many people still don’t take these tools seriously.

Click below to view the table:

Found via: http://informl.com/2008/08/15/web-20-learning-puzzle-pieces/

Podcast Fast with GCast June 28, 2008

Posted by B.J. Schone in eLearning.
Tags: , , , ,
1 comment so far

Yes, that’s probably the cheesiest title I’ve ever used, I know… But I recently found out about GCast, a free service that lets you record messages using your phone and then converts them to a podcast. Sure, this is kind of similar to Jott, but I like the simplicity of GCast. It does one thing, and it does it well.

Here’s how it works: Once you set up an account (again, it’s free), you can dial into a 1-888… number, enter your PIN, and record a voice message. After hanging up, your message is immediately available as a podcast online. People can subscribe to your feed and get updates whenever you record new messages. It’s quick and easy. Go here to hear an example. (WordPress won’t let me embed the Flash widget that plays the podcasts… Grrr.)

So, how might this apply to eLearning? GCast could be used in these ways…

  • Management could record soundbytes or motivational tidbits for employees.
  • Sales managers could record coaching tips for their sales staff that are out on the road.
  • Executives can use it to keep in touch with employees, make announcements, give weekly updates, etc.
  • You can capture those "A-ha!" moments while driving in the car.
  • You could produce a weekly podcast featuring tips and tricks for employees at your organization. You could interview senior-level workers and get them to share their wisdom with the rest of the organization.
  • …you tell me! I’d love to hear your ideas.

Here’s more info about GCast, straight from their site:

We offer many ways to add to your podcast channel:

  • Record messages by phone (never touch a computer!)
  • Upload MP3 files from your computer
  • Add “podsafe” songs from GarageBand.com (Note: Gcast is run by the same people that run GarageBand.com.)
  • Mix all the above with our online playlist manager

Whether you’re podcasting a 30-sec phone message or a 30-min radio show, you can publish it with Gcast for FREE. We’ll store your media and automatically generate the “RSS feed” that enables listeners to “tune in” to your podcast channel.

Give it a shot… It’s free and very easy!!